Archive for May, 2009

Pennsylvania Car Dealer Uses Targeted Email Targeted to Drive Business

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

I just got done reading yet another article about a car dealer who has turned to one of the most cost-effective forms of direct response marketing: targeted email campaigns. Pennsylvania based Brown Daub, uses an in-house program to send their geotargeted emails to local, potential car buyers. The dealer was able to instantly monitor their post-campaign results, including click through rates and open rates, to determine the effectiveness of their email campaign.

According to Dianna Dilworth of DMNews.com, “The brand is working on an e-mail to go out in June that targets Pennsylvania consumers that live in towns where Dodge and Chrysler dealers have closed, to let them know that they can still have their cars maintained at Brown Daub.” This type of communication can cost a dealership around a penny or less per email, which can generate website traffic at a much lower cost than other traditional marketing mediums.

Brown Daub saw an 11% click through rate on their first targeted campaign and while this is a good result compared to industry standards, A/B testing on content and subject lines, as well as the tweaking of the different list segmentations can yield an increase in these results.

For more information on car dealership marketing, contact Angie Commorato at angie@consultagc.com.

Google Adwords Lightens Up on Trademark Policy

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

For any of you resellers, retailers or affiliates who utilize Google Adwords to promote your products, things may have just got a little easier. It is now possible to use certain trademarked phrases in your ad copy, providing that you meet the new guidelines put in place by Google.

Previously, if you were a pet supply company wishing to promote Hartz flea medication, you could more than likely bid on key phrases including the word “Hartz”, but could not include that word in your actual ad.  This led to high bidding costs and low conversion and click throughs. Now, Google is allowing you to include the brand name if you follow the rules.

What does this mean for Google? Well more advertiser spend, of course, resulting in more revenue for Google. Although I have fought for this leniency in the past, I can see how this could be problematic for the owners of the brand name. More targeted competition for their brand name is going to result in higher bid costs for the corporate brand. This can lead to frustration and reduce the ability of the brand owner to brand their particular product, due to increasing conversion costs. Either way, Google comes out as the winner, that is until someone decides to bring a lawsuit against them for the lack of protection on their brand name. Either way, these new rules are now active, so take a look at your current campaigns to see if you can start targeting more efficiently.