Archive for the ‘Web Statistics & Tracking’ Category

Click Fraud For Paid Search Up for Q3 2010

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

According to a recent report released by Click Forensics®, Inc., click fraud for paid search advertising mediums, including popular pay-per-click advertising programs, was up to 22.3% in the third quarter of 2010. These stats were gathered from Cost Per Click campaigns, also referred to as CPC, PPC or pay per click, across all of the major search engines, as well as comparison shopping engines and social network advertising platforms.

Here are some of the key statistics for the study:

  • Among small to large businesses,  the overall industry average click fraud rate was 22.3 percent,  up from the 18.6% for Q2 2010 and 14.1 % reported for Q3 2009.
  • In Q3 2010, the countries outside North America with significant CPC traffic producing the greatest volume of click fraud were Japan, The Netherlands, The Philippines and China, respectively.

These statistics are very concerning. Over the years, we have seen companies losing thousands of dollars on a monthly basis to fraudulent click traffic. This can happen right under the company’s nose and yet if they don’t know what to look for, it can continue to happen on a daily basis.

Although the major pay per click advertisers continue to implement better click fraud monitoring throughout their advertising systems, it is still important for any advertiser to be able to watch for trends in their analytics and web logs that might indicate that you are becoming a victim of fraudulent clicks.

If your business has active pay per click or other paid search campaigns, it is very important to monitor your activity on a weekly or monthly basis and to report any suspicious activity to your paid search representative.

For more information on how you can protect your monthly spend for the various paid search advertising platforms, contact a&g at www.consultagc.com.

Don’t Let Web Analytics Intimidate Your Small Business

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009

In a time of tightened budgeting and online, knowing all about your web visitors is more important than ever. Many hosting platforms offer website traffic statistics but tracking your conversions is usually not something that is offered by these applications. While there are many great statistic software applications available for purchase, I often recommend Google Analytics to many small businesses for several reasons. Google Analytics can be implemented fairly easily in to your website, by placing a chunk of code on every page of the site. After the site is confirmed, you will be able to access your site visitor information, down to the city of the visitor. The best part? Google Analytics is free.

There is a learning curve to the program and information overload can happen if you don’t know where to focus your attention. If you want to start with a general overview of what is happening on your website, I would recommend monitoring a few specific categories.

1. Unique Visitors: I often hear businesses discussing “hits” on their websites and using that for a gauge on how they website is performing. This number can highly overestimate the popularity of your website. A hit is registered whenever one of the many files on your website is loaded. For example, a single page in your site might have 10 images, as well as 2 script files within it’s code. This page could register 12 or more hits from one single visit to the  web page. For that reason, I monitor unique visitors. This number will provide a more accurate way of monitoring the number of people who come to your site, excluding multiple visits from the same computer.

2. Referring Sources – Having spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on marketing during my career, I consider the referral data on your statistics to be very important. The referring sources will be able to tell you who is sending you traffic. This can be very valuable if you are spending company time exposing your business to the social networking marketing mediums, or more importantly, paying for display and paid search marketing.

3. Conversion – This is the most important statistic that you are going to monitor, hands down. You can drive all of the traffic in the world to your site, but if they are not turning in to a customer, then you have some work to do. Google Analytics allows you to place some code on your site at what you consider to be the point of conversion. For most businesses, this is the order confirmation page, which thanks them for placing their order. However a business’s goal may be to drive an online information request lead or to drive a phone call. In these cases, placing the code on the contact form confirmation or on the contact page itself can give you an idea of the interest in your particular conversion. Either way, if you are getting the traffic without conversions, it is time to dig deeper in to your site to find out what is happening. In these cases, bounce rates and average time spent on the site by a visitor can get you pointed in the right direction.

For more information on conversion tracking on your website, contact Angie Commorato at blog@commorato.com. Angie is an Indianapolis based web consultant and owner of the online marketing company, a&g Digital Consulting, LLC.